inspiration

Sketchbooks: Your Gateway to Children’s Book Production

by Sabina Hahn

Steve Light is a children’s book writer / illustrator and a teacher.

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The Ins And Outs Of The Graphic Novel: Calista Brill, Judy Hansen and Andrew Arnold in Conversation About Graphic Novels, From Concept to Published Book

by K. Marcus

Judy Hansen of the Hansen Literary Management, LLC, a literary agent specializing in graphic novels, strongly recommends that “if you want to learn how to create graphic novels and comics, both known as ‘sequential art’, the best resources to begin with are:”

Understanding Comics by Scott Mcloud

Making Comics by Scott Mcloud

Comics and Sequential Art by Wil Eisner

Then move on to “cutting edge” graphic novels and focus on their lettering and ballooning:

Amelia Rules! (series) and The Dumbest Idea Ever by Jimmy Gownley to look at paneling, ballooning & lettering and Hereville (series) by Barry Deutsch to see paneling & ballooning. And continue to read, read, read. Calista Brill, senior editor at First Second Books, added, “Sometimes people think of comics as ‘books light’ but they are very sophisticated and kids who read comics learn to pick up on these flourishes.”

Andrew Arnold, designer at Roaring Brook Press/FSG and a comics/graphic novel author/illustrator has “learned to never underestimate how smart kids are.”

Judy Hansen went on to say that “kids comics have commercial viability and have a great possibility for ancillary rights development.”

But graphic novels aren’t only for children. There is a market for adults as well. In both age groups, Calista Brill said, “the text and art should combine to make something greater than itself.” “A panel in a comic book doesn’t want to be perfect, something should be missing so it then directs you to the next panel.” The author/illustrator needs to think about text placement and how that leads the reader through the story.

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5 Questions With Elizabeth Baddeley

SCBWILogo_color (1) (1)Last summer we hosted a contest to design a new logo for our chapter. The criteria was simple: include the SCBWI kite and keep it NYC-themed.

We didn’t envy the job of Laurent Linn, Art Director of Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, who was tasked with picking a winner from the pool of incredibly lovely submissions. He ended up choosing a playful design that nods at one of New York’s most recognizable symbols – the Statue Of Liberty.

Get to know our logo contest winner Elizabeth Baddeley in the interview below. She’ll be teaching a hand lettering workshop coming up this November! (more…)

The ABC Of It: Why Children’s Books Matter With Leonard Marcus

Originally Posted: February 2014

by Leah Heilman Schanke

Leonard Marcus, historian, author, critic, and curator of The ABC of It: Why Children’s Books Matter at the New York Public Library (NYPL) began his presentation by simply defining an exhibit as storytelling in three dimensions. Marcus observed that when people think about children’s books, they primarily think about them in terms of their personal experience. Marcus places books in a larger context by considering:

  • How are children’s books a part of literature?
  • How are the illustrations a part of art?
  • What do the stories say about culture? (more…)

2013 Illustrator’s Boot Camp: Finding The Joy

Originally Posted: September 2013

by Melanie Hope Greenberg

Caldecott Honor-winner Peter McCarty, like many picture book artists, fell into the publishing business as a freelance illustrator who was in the right place at the right time. He has gone on to become one of the most honored in the children’s book field. In a wide-ranging talk, McCarty described his constant quest to stay true to the kind of drawing he loves while also finding a style that is commercially appealing. (more…)